Living on the Edge

Lady's Mantle is the perfect edger in A Garden For All by Kathy Diemer https://agardenforall.com

Lady’s Mantle is a beautiful edger (Photo by: Kathy Diemer)

Living on the edge of the garden, up front and exposed, can sometimes be a scary place for a plant. All that pressure to perform and look good … after all, they’re front and center for all to see! But being center stage doesn’t have to be so risky, if you choose the right plants for your site and conditions. Here are a few of my long time durables that never fail to dazzle, despite the foul weather that Mother Nature dishes out. [Read more…]

Thyme is On My Side

Woolly and Lemon Thyme line my gravel walkway in A Garden For All by Kathy Diemer https://agardenforall.com

Woolly and Lemon Thyme line my gravel walkway (Photo by: Kathy Diemer)

Although tiny and often overlooked, thyme is one of the greatest workhorses in the garden, both as an ornamental plant and beneficial herb. Everything about thyme is harmonious; content to be tread upon and live happily on the edge without any care, except an occasional pruning to prevent legginess. Thyme is comfortable existing under the foliage of taller plants, and equally appeased when it can gently tumble over nearby sedum or other willing companions. With sun, well drained soil and a little space, thyme will soon become a beloved garden friend. [Read more…]

Parsley, Sage, Rosemary and Thyme . . .

Tricolor Sage in A Garden For All by Kathy Diemer https://agardenforall.com

Tricolor Sage (photo credit: Kathy Diemer)

. . . are fabulous herbs, all.  However, by November the parsley is history and rosemary is stored safely inside, leaving sage and thyme to endure whatever Old Man Winter dishes out. During the milder winters, my sage remains evergreen and the thyme doesn’t brown until February.  Every year is a toss up, but whatever happens, these two herbs remain dependably attractive for much longer than the most durable perennials.  They smell great, feel great and add a much needed touch of texture that foraging critters shun.  What could be better during the dormant months ahead? [Read more…]